La nature... un chemin (FICTION) (French Edition)

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Paris, PUF.

BRAMLY Serge - Etonnants Voyageurs

Paris, Gallimard. Paris, Albin Michel. Paris, Dunod. Paris, Aubier. Paris, Armand Colin. Paris, PUF: Paris, Ramsay. Paris, Odile Jacob.

19th Century Authors

Tisseron Londres, Methuen. Paris, Le Seuil. Paris, Plon.


  1. Alain Blottière;
  2. Fiction utopique et examen critique : la Révolution culturelle dans «L’Âge d’or» de Wang Xiaobo!
  3. The Canadian Accessible Library System.

Haut de page. Auteur Serge Tisseron Haut de page. I received this from netgalley. Mauro finds his path in life: baking cakes as a child; cooking for his friends as a teenager; a series of studies, jobs, and travels; a failed love affair; a successful business; a virtual nervous breakdown; and—at the end—a rediscovery of his hunger for cooking, his appetite for life.

Fast read. Focusing on cooking, the terminology, and lots of foodie talk. It really did feel like some kind of a documentary. As much as I really wanted I received this from netgalley. As much as I really wanted to like this book, it was a dry read for me. This little book tells the story of following one's dream and marching to the beat of one's own drum The prose is translated beautifully and the culinary knowledge throughout makes the book extra delectable. A small portion of a book which left me fully satisfied. The story flowed well and since I have a few friends who are chefs, it was also believable.

Thank you to NetGalley, author and publisher for providing a free copy of this book.

I received an advance reading copy of this book thanks to Farrar, Straus and Giroux via NetGalley This was a quick little read but I must say de Kerangal has a gift with written word. Penned beautifully and with such a lyrical translation from Taylor, I was blown away by the impact the prose had on me whilst reading. Having grown up in the hospitality industry nothing in Mauro's story surprised me. I know the tough slog it requires to be a chef, the sheer dedication it takes to live your dream and I received an advance reading copy of this book thanks to Farrar, Straus and Giroux via NetGalley This was a quick little read but I must say de Kerangal has a gift with written word.

Stolen Child

I know the tough slog it requires to be a chef, the sheer dedication it takes to live your dream and the deep love of food you're required to possess if you don't want the industry to grind you down. I would have loved for this to be five times the length that it was. The use of language and the structure of the narrative would have entertained me for days. This was a shortie, an atmospheric little translated novel about a young man with a lifelong love of cooking who approaches the profession from a bunch of oblique angles, unsure of where he wants to land. Form follows function here—the book itself flashes in and out of brilliantly illuminated scenes from his life, almost like sights glimpsed from a train window and in fact the novel opens on a train, so that might not be so fanciful of an analogy.

Told from the point of view of an unidentified This was a shortie, an atmospheric little translated novel about a young man with a lifelong love of cooking who approaches the profession from a bunch of oblique angles, unsure of where he wants to land. Told from the point of view of an unidentified close friend, it follows Paolo through the places he works, and then owns, during his early career as a cook or chef, and the episodic narration really gets at how intense—both wonderful and awful—working in a kitchen is at any level. Great food descriptions, too. Not sure how long de Kerangal could have sustained the story past the novella stage, but it works the way it is: a tasting menu, a series of amuse-bouches, rather than a heavy meal.

When you're young, and you're making decisions about school subjects and careers, there are inevitably pressures. For some kids, their passions line-up with family or social expectations. Lucky them. For others, expectations can steer them away from what they'd really, really like to be doing. I think we all know of that person who desperately wanted to be a carpenter or an artist or in advertising, yet they come from a 'family of doctors' and suddenly find their Year 12 dominated by chemistry a When you're young, and you're making decisions about school subjects and careers, there are inevitably pressures.

I think we all know of that person who desperately wanted to be a carpenter or an artist or in advertising, yet they come from a 'family of doctors' and suddenly find their Year 12 dominated by chemistry and biology rather than graphic design. Personally speaking, I traded a Forestry degree for Environmental Planning - I think I probably would have ended up in the same place regardless but I can't deny that my mum's concerns about my being posted as a park ranger somewhere remote , didn't go unheard.

The story of The Cook by Maylis de Kerangal begins along similar lines - Mauro is a young self-taught cook. While he has a natural flair for cookery and his bohemian parents encourage him to pursue it as a career, he chooses the security of a degree in economics. He works in a kitchen simply to pay his way through business school and to fund his travels. Eventually his love of cooking takes over and as Mauro travels from Paris to Berlin, Thailand, Lisbon and Burma we get snapshots of various cuisines, chefs, and kitchen politics. The story is tightly condensed and yet you get to know Mauro via the unnamed female narrator.

Quite frankly, I thought he was more smart-arse than wunderkind - his ego was as big as any of the chefs he scorned and he was prone to pontificating. Kerangal's writing has been described as poetic - there were certainly obvious and sure changes of pace, which gave energy to the kitchen scenes but not the frenzy captured in other stories such as Danler's Sweetbitter. I was left thinking that if you wanted a kitchen a story, with its violence, creativity, and craziness, you really can't go past Bourdain.

A lovely short portrait to savor! Beautiful observation of a chef emergence as Mauro begins his culinary expedition leading to peaks, burnouts and a rediscovery of what communal dining can be. Atmospheric snapshots of Paris, Berlin and parts of Asia journey readers en voyage with Mauro and a blurry first person narrator who may or may not be his paramour. Mauro, full time student of economics has a part time passion and employment both paid and unpaid in the world of food. Cooking is the perfect counterbalance to his studies. Once studies are complete Mauro continues his journey working for free and for euro as he piecemeal puts together his education.

The rest of his discovery comes from following his endless quest to learn more about cooking. The author does an excellent job dramatizing the nomadic lifestyle and independent personalities often found within the world of chefs. The only issue I have is found with the narrator. For this I drop a star as the work was short and I was distracted by the person behind the voice. Told and translated with joie de vie beautiful, lean and lush.

2 – It’s Easy to Get Lost on the Saint James Way!

This brief little lovely just got purchased for my personal collection for its simplicity, educative capacity and collection of active verbs, sensate adjectives, and lingering nouns all dancing around a table with stunning food calling us to gather and savor. At exactly pages, this little treasure portrays through an unnamed female narrator the story of Mauro, a gifted man who both academically and through culinary exploration will not settle for what doesn't feel right.

I get this completely. Mauro walks away from what appear to be wonderful opportunities to gain experience and acclaim in his work as a chef He seeks meaning in his At exactly pages, this little treasure portrays through an unnamed female narrator the story of Mauro, a gifted man who both academically and through culinary exploration will not settle for what doesn't feel right. He seeks meaning in his work and observes so much of his environment, surroundings to know when to walk away to find something that speaks more to his soul than what the surface provides. The unnamed narrator speaks of herself as a friend to Mauro; however, perhaps, it is a little more than friendship in her eyes.

Yet, I believe the narrator is also representative of what Mauro seeks - an unconditional devotion, a meaning and purpose in relationship and life.

Tiny yet brilliant French work. Despite my love of movies and comics related to cooking I was not planning on picking up this slim volume, but am glad I did. It was the salami on the cover my favorite meat, one that invigorates the taste buds, in its many forms that brought me in, not much to lose. Well guys I lost nothing and gained much. The bare bones story of a self taught chef told from the perspective of an unnamed narrator who's interior life we know nothing about, I was deeply moved from what I felt was beautiful pro Despite my love of movies and comics related to cooking I was not planning on picking up this slim volume, but am glad I did.

The bare bones story of a self taught chef told from the perspective of an unnamed narrator who's interior life we know nothing about, I was deeply moved from what I felt was beautiful prose. I've been thinking recently about works in translation and the initimate improvisational game that needs to be played between author and translator. The translator interpreting the work in the best way they see fit, bringing us into a whole other world we may not ever see. It was poetic and wonderful to read.

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Nuit spéciale Philip K. Dick

French author, Maylis de Kerangal, does an excellent job in describing the protagonists love of his profession, his passion for food, and even his emotional dealings with his own feelings throughout his career. Never pretentious, a simple short novel that will entertain any one that has any interest in the sensations of eating and preparing good food. A very good read. Maylis de Kerangal's style in The Cook is not a sumptuous seven-course meal; rather, it is an escargot on a plate drizzled in a few drops of garlic sauce with maybe one sprig of chive.

L'ENFANT LOUP - Film complet en français - Famille - HD - 1080

Her spare, simple style moves as quickly as her character, loner Mauro, a self-taught cook who is always driven to the next thing. The story's narrator deeply admires Mauro's talents. She places him on a pedestal. Her descriptions of each of his culinary conquests leave me no doubt of his giftedness or of the empt Maylis de Kerangal's style in The Cook is not a sumptuous seven-course meal; rather, it is an escargot on a plate drizzled in a few drops of garlic sauce with maybe one sprig of chive. Her descriptions of each of his culinary conquests leave me no doubt of his giftedness or of the emptiness of his obsessive personality.

This novel leaves me hungry for a hero. It reminds me a lot of Soma from the anime, Food Wars. In full disclosure - I received this book as a Goodreads giveaway. As an accomplished amateur cook I have an obsessive almost interest in cookbooks. This is not a cookbook.

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